Buy ‘Em or Deny ‘Em: Has Carlos Gonzalez Become A Fantasy Platoon Player?

We all know that, when healthy, Carlos Gonzalez is one of the elite players in te game. In 2,166 career at bats he has posted a .299 average to go along with a .371 OBP and .518 slugging percentage. Throw in 20+ stolen bases each of the past three seasons and what is there not to like?

Obviously the health, which always seems to be a issue. However, you also have to start wondering how much of his value stems from playing half his home games at Coors Field.  Just look at his numbers from 2012:

  • Home – .368, 13 HR, 58 RBI, 58 R
  • Road – .234, 9 HR, 27 RBI, 31 R

Of course there was some luck involved, with a .425 BABIP at home compared to a .272 mark on the road. To an extent it’s not a surprise, as hitters at generally more comfortable at home where they are used to the sight lines. However, can it make that big of a difference that he holds a 25.7% line drive rate at home and a 17.3% mark on the road?

Before we answer that, let’s look at the previous two seasons to see if this is a one year aberration or a trend:

2010
Home – .380, 26 HR, 76 RBI, 70 R
Road – .289, 8 HR, 41 RBI, 41 R
(road line drive rate of 18.5% and BABIP of .375)

2011
Home – .331, 16 HR, 60 RBI, 61 R
Road – .252, 10 HR, 32 RBI, 31 R
(road line drive rate of 17.1% and BABIP of .288)

Clearly, 2012 was no aberration. Gonzalez is a superstar at home, but a mere mortal player on the road. Part of that is the thin air and bigger ballpark, and I do believe part of that is seeing the ball better as displayed by his career 18.2% strikeout rate at home vs. 24.2% on the road. Thin air may help you hit more home runs and bigger confines may help you find more holes, but they don’t help you make better contact.

Obviously, if Gonzalez were to ever leave the Rockies our view of hm would change dramatically. At this point, however, we don’t need to worry about that. Playing half his games at Coors Field, where he has consistently hit well over .300, is going to be more than enough to keep him as an extremely good option. If he can get lucky and post road numbers between what he did in 2010 and 2011, he is going to be elite.

Is he a player who should be sat down on the road? I certainly wouldn’t go that far, because his speed, runs scored and potential should keep him viable regardless. Just know that, if something were to happen, you would want to cash in before the rest of your league figures it out.

What are your thoughts of Gonzalez?  Is he a player you believe should be sat down on the road?  Why or why not?

***** Pre-order the Rotoprofessor 2013 Fantasy Baseball Draft Guide today for just $5 (the price increases on December 1)!!  Expanded rankings, prospect lists, Top 25 sleepers and so much more!  To order, or for more information, click here. *****

Make sure to check out all of our extremely early 2013 rankings:

 

Posted on by Rotoprofessor. This entry was posted in Player Analysis. Bookmark the permalink.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

 

2 Responses to Buy ‘Em or Deny ‘Em: Has Carlos Gonzalez Become A Fantasy Platoon Player?

  1. Scott says:

    I am a huge Gonzalez fan, but I have really been thinking about trading him in a keeper league. I have him in the 5th round of an 11 team league (he will be a 3rd rounder next year, 1st round the year after). It is great value based on preliminary rankings, but I think everything discussed above, just reinforces the doubts I have had about him. His home-road splits don’t particularly allow for him to get to that next level, which of course diminishes his return as a first round pick. Any thoughts about my keeper conundrum?

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


























































Pages