Kearse vs. Richardson: Which Young Wide Receiver Should We Target In Seattle?

by Eric Stashin (aka The Rotoprofessor)

The Seattle Seahawks have never been known as a passing team and it’s hard to imagine things suddenly changing. However, with there being a ton of risk tied to Marshawn Lynch this season and a healthy (for now) Percy Harvin now in the mix. That could open up a few opportunities, and the team has two young receivers who could step up and make an impact. Who should have more fantasy appeal? Let’s take a look:

 

Jermaine Kearse
He made a name for himself in the Super Bowl last season, with 4 catches for 65 yards and a touchdown. Having also scored a TD in the NFC championship game, there’s obviously going to be a little bit more attention paid to a receiver who only managed 22 catches for 346 yards and 4 TD in the regular season.

Normally this is the type of post season hero that we recommend ignoring, but being behind Percy Harvin and Sidney Rice has helped suppress any hype. Kearse showed an ability to find the end zone at the University of Washington, with 27 TD over his final three seasons.

However he went an undrafted despite ESPN saying:

“Kearse was an athletic and extremely productive receiver for Washington. He is a polished route runner who shows his athletic ability when going after the ball and can reel in most thrown his way.”

Entering his third season there is definitely reason to believe that he could take his game up a notch in the coming season.

 

Paul Richardson
Drafted in the second round, he is coming off a year where he posted 83 catches for 1,343 yards and 10 TD for the University of Colorado. However, he has battled knee injuries in college and that is obviously going to be a major concern. He also is listed at 175 lbs., so you know there is going to be concern of his ability to take hits in the NFL.

NFL.com summed it all up nicely in their redraft scouting report:

“Very lean, narrow-framed, finesse “X” receiver who made an immediate impact at Colorado before knee injuries derailed his progress. Measurables will go a long way in determining his ultimate draft value, and his success at the next level is dependent upon his ability to make plays in the vertical passing game. Has a boom-or-bust element. Size and durability are question marks.”

He’s got to be viewed as a potential big play threat, but one that is not going to be dependable on a weekly basis. Instead, the threat of him should open things up underneath.

 

Conclusion:
Long-term it is easy to imagine Richardson being the better receiver, though his history of knee injuries is a significant concern. He’s not someone to invest heavily in, even in dynasty formats.

In 2014 Kearse is definitely the receiver to own, though is hardly a guarantee to make an impact. As we said this isn’t going to be a pass heavy attack, though with Harvin’s injury history there could ultimately be an opportunity.

Sources – ESPN, NFL.com

*** Make sure to pre-order Rotoprofessor’s 2014 Fantasy Football Draft Guide!!  The guide comes complete with projections of over 350 players, expended rankings, sleepers, and so much more (including constant updates up until opening day).  For just $6 you will get everything you need to dominate your fantasy league and one lucky subscriber will win a free autographed Brett Favre 8×10!  For more information and to place your order, click here. ***

Make sure to check out all of our 2014 rankings:

Three Players Worth Reaching For On Draft Day
Has Bishop Sankey Played His Way Out Of Fantasy Viability?

2 comments

  1. ron says:

    Hey Eric. Love this site. I’m in a 14 team PPR league which also counts kick/punt return yardage. Starting positions include 1 QB, 2 RB, 4 WR, 1 TE, and 2 flex (WR/RB/TE). I am drafting in the 7 spot of a snake draft and would love some advice on how to approach the first five rounds or so. Thanks for the help.

    • Is it PPR? 4 or 6 pts. per passing TD?

      Regardless, getting a top RB in the first round, if possible, is the way to go if possible. There is a lot of doubt around the position and a lot more teams going with time shares so if someone like Eddie Lacy gets to 7 I wouldn’t hesitate.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *